21

Aug

Digital Painting – Clouds


Digital Painting – Clouds

Digital Painting – Clouds Loading

Clouds are always an interesting subject for painters and artists and the fact that they can take on many shapes and colors depending on the season makes it even more appealing. However, drawing and painting clouds can be one of the most difficult tasks that artists can undertake. The famous landscape artist Bob Ross made […]

Clouds are always an interesting subject for painters and artists and the fact that they can take on many shapes and colors depending on the season makes it even more appealing. However, drawing and painting clouds can be one of the most difficult tasks that artists can undertake. The famous landscape artist Bob Ross made the whole subject of painting clouds look very easy but in fact there are some tips to that you can follow and understand that will allow you to do the same.

 

In Bob Ross’s paintings, the technique that he always adopted was called the “wet on wet” technique where the canvas had a wet coating to it and he would mix colors and apply directly. The advantage of this technique is that the underlying “wet layer” can mix with the applied paint to give added flexibility to the kind of colors and effects that you are aiming for on the painting. This technique was particularly useful when drawing clouds, where the overcoat paint can mix or blend with the background to give a gaseous and a cloudy impression. Mr Ross would typically take a dry brush after creating the cloud formation and gently go over it to give a soft effect to the cloud edges.

 

We can apply a similar method to Bob Ross for digital painting but with a whole new set of tools. Basically, its a question of which tools and how to make better use of them. You will notice that many of the brush styles have settings for density and hardness as well as the size in the Paintology app brush selector. These settings become particularly useful for creating clouds because the density or translucency of the cloud cover can be varied by playing with the density and hardness settings. In actual fact, creating clouds using this method is more effective than the traditional way of painting.

 

In the painting here, I pick a light blue color for the canvas and using the shade brush tool with a large size, I simply go from dark blue to light blue for the background. Then using the charcoal brush tool with a white color and a medium brush size, I form the cloud shape and vary the colors to give the grey patches. The realism of the clouds pop out when you select a smaller brush and paint around the edges and you will immediately see the clouds standing out. This is because the sky has a lot of translucency and contrast as opposed to the land when clouds stand out distinctively from the background.

 

A good tip for cloud painting is to take some pictures with your compact camera when you next go out and pay attention to the different types of shapes and how they change depending on how high they are up from the horizon. When you are back at your house, print out the pictures and try to replicate on your tablet or smart phone. Some clouds are very longitudinal and using your fingers can produce nice effects such as the case in the finger painting method of drawing a sunset. Please see the examples on this site.

 

Here are further links to help you create better clouds.

 



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